The Virginia General Assembly likes to keep their proceedings a secret. Missed the live webstream of a debate or discussion about a bill? You’re out of luck—there’s no way to watch them later.
But. The Virginia General Assembly sellsvideo of their proceedings for $10 per DVD.  For the past five years, Richmond Sunlight has annually managed to cobble together the funding to buy a copy of each and every one of those DVDs, rip them, and put them online (on Richmond Sunlight and the Internet Archive) for anybody to watch.
That’s where you come in. It’s expensive to buy all this video. There are guaranteed to be at least two DVDs per day—one for the House, one for the Senate—but some days they go long and two, even three DVDs are created for one or both chambers. Legislative staff tell us that it’ll cost us $1,240 to buy the DVDs for all of 2012, and the video for 2013 will run approximately $930.
So that’s $2,170 to acquire approximately 81 days of video. With the 5% Kickstarter fee and the 5% Amazon Payments fee, that’s a cost of $2,387 to acquire the 2012 and 2013 video, or an average of $14.73 per day per chamber (the House and the Senate).
Richmond Sunlight makes no money off of this—all contributions will be passed along directly to the legislature to buy these DVDs. In fact, Richmond Sunlight has no money, and never has. It has bank account, no revenue, no way to pay for anything at all. (As a result, the IRS counts this as taxable personal income for me, so I’ll probably have pay a few hundred bucks out of pocket come April 15.) In short, if you don’t donate, this won’t happen.Period.
$15 will pay for one day’s video for one chamber. $30 will pay for one day’s video for both chambers. $150 will acquire one week’s video for both chambers. For every $15 you donate, Richmond Sunlight will permanently credit you on one day’s video for one chamber, thanking you for buying that video to make it available freely.
Support transparency. Join us in liberating the 2012 and 2013 Virginia General Assembly video.

Seriously, if you can afford a Starbucks latte, you can afford to help back this project.

The Virginia General Assembly likes to keep their proceedings a secret. Missed the live webstream of a debate or discussion about a bill? You’re out of luck—there’s no way to watch them later.

But. The Virginia General Assembly sellsvideo of their proceedings for $10 per DVD.  For the past five years, Richmond Sunlight has annually managed to cobble together the funding to buy a copy of each and every one of those DVDs, rip them, and put them online (on Richmond Sunlight and the Internet Archive) for anybody to watch.

That’s where you come in. It’s expensive to buy all this video. There are guaranteed to be at least two DVDs per day—one for the House, one for the Senate—but some days they go long and two, even three DVDs are created for one or both chambers. Legislative staff tell us that it’ll cost us $1,240 to buy the DVDs for all of 2012, and the video for 2013 will run approximately $930.

So that’s $2,170 to acquire approximately 81 days of video. With the 5% Kickstarter fee and the 5% Amazon Payments fee, that’s a cost of $2,387 to acquire the 2012 and 2013 video, or an average of $14.73 per day per chamber (the House and the Senate).

Richmond Sunlight makes no money off of this—all contributions will be passed along directly to the legislature to buy these DVDs. In fact, Richmond Sunlight has no money, and never has. It has bank account, no revenue, no way to pay for anything at all. (As a result, the IRS counts this as taxable personal income for me, so I’ll probably have pay a few hundred bucks out of pocket come April 15.) In short, if you don’t donate, this won’t happen.Period.

$15 will pay for one day’s video for one chamber. $30 will pay for one day’s video for both chambers. $150 will acquire one week’s video for both chambers. For every $15 you donate, Richmond Sunlight will permanently credit you on one day’s video for one chamber, thanking you for buying that video to make it available freely.

Support transparency. Join us in liberating the 2012 and 2013 Virginia General Assembly video.

Seriously, if you can afford a Starbucks latte, you can afford to help back this project.

  1. cynicalidealist said: Why not demand that Virginia host these archives online instead?
  2. joestanley said: In the past, this has been the only ongoing cost that comes up year to year, so it wasn’t worth the bookkeeping. Now that he’s expanding into new initiatives, he may make an umbrella c3 next year.
  3. joestanley posted this